Sunday, March 12, 2006


“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere . . . Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

Sometimes I come across things that are so stupid, so dripping with self-righteous selfishness, so fully informed with lies, that I find it almost impossible to comprehend what I am reading.

This little nugget comes from the totally misinformed "blog" of the nutty professor at U of M. But first, a disclaimer: I am not responsible for any injuries to the reader's person if said reader falls out of his/her chair due to shock and disbelief at reading the following. Neither am I responsible for any damage a reader may, in anger, inflict on the reader's own computer monitor, keyboard, mouse, PCU, or any other property of the reader after reading the following comment on the situation in "Iraq":

At 1:41 AM, Kelly said...


You know, day after day I read your comments and sometimes there is a gleam of hope admidst the despair, but lately I find myself wishing more and more that we really did have a time machine and could go back in time to before this war and just erase the whole blasted thing from history. I even find myself wishing for Saddam Hussein again. Even from his trial for his life, he was trying to unite his people, to lead his people so that there would not be a civil war. He was a leader who many despised but at least it seemed that he united the country, unlike the leaders of Iraq right now. I don't know.. this just cannot end well.. I am worried that things are just going to deteriorate more and more.

So here we have someone who never spent one day under the terroristic reign of the Bully from Baghdad, wishing that said bully were still leading "his people" because he "united his country," under a cruel reign of terror, a reign of terror which existed with the blessing of the West as well as the Arab/Islamic world, both of which maintain total silence on the previous regime's atrocities. This is quite possibly the absolute nadir of unvarnished, selfish, Western liberal--dare I say it--RACISM.

To hell with every last one of these self-righteous hypocrites even though, in my opinion, hell would still be too good a place for this kind of human trash.

In reference to the poor, helpless, innocent dictator, fighting to save his own goat-smelling ass at his first trial, the same dictator that the "Kellys" of this world worship and support, we have the following, from the WSJ:

Last week, Saddam acknowledged in court that he had ordered the summary trial that led to the execution of the villagers and the destruction of their farmland. "Where is the crime?" he asked, claiming that as president of Iraq all his actions were lawful. Nazi defendants at the Nuremberg trial famously adopted a similar defense.

Saddam and his seven co-defendants have also been doing their utmost to turn the trial into farce, heckling the judges and calling on Iraqis watching on TV to rise up against Coalition forces. Saddam has also protested the indignity of having to ride a service elevator and use a toilet exposed to public view. "Is this humanitarian?" he griped in court.

Ah, yes! I can hear them all now, all the "Kellys" of the world, echoing, "Where is the crime?" like some macabre chorus in a Greek tragedy gone Iraqi.

Here is the Bastard from Tikrit, who caused rivers of blood to pour from his prisons, who watered the dry ground of Iraq with human blood, and I have no doubt that the "Kellys" of this world will rush to his defense, over the so-called atrocious treatment of his imprisonment. Mind you that the "Kellys" of the world are the same ones who have remained silent of the fate of the real victims of their glorious Ba'athi leader.

Let us hear some testimony from one of those victims, of the Dujail massacre, who was fifteen-years old at the time:

Seated less than three metres from his tormentor, Mohammad fondled postcards of his dead relatives as he fought to be heard over interjections from Saddam and his henchmen.

Unlike most of the witnesses who will be heard in the coming days, Mohammad insisted that he be face-to-face with the seven accused and the world, refusing the offer of a screen that might shield his identity.

He started with hearing the gunfire of the failed assassination bid and he commanded utter silence as he recounted what for anyone - let alone a 15-year-old boy as he was at the time - would be a harrowing night at a military police post with 350 others, some of whom he saw tortured.

"They blindfolded me. But I was so young, it kept falling." And amid the recollected horror he insisted on a particularly gruesome scene at a Baghdad detention centre "a machine that looked like a grinder and had some blood and hair [on it and] I saw bodies of people from Dujail".

This is what "Kelly," and all those like "Kelly," wish for. Only they don't wish it for their own, because they were never personally touched by any of this. Nor do the "Kellys" of this world have the intelligence or compassion to imagine themselves and their loved ones in the place of Mohammed and his loved ones. The "Kellys" of this world reflect all the basest qualities of human nature and are, therefore, even worse in their humanity than the Bastard from Tikrit.

What else do the "Kellys" of this world support? All the crimes of the Bastard from Tikrit, about which everyone can educate themselves at the INDICT website. And this on the Kurdish genocide. Or this, or this, or this, or this. And I could go on and on and on. . .

I wish we had a time machine, too, dear "Kellys" of this world, and then the rest of us could set the date for 8 July, 1982 or 16 March, 1988, location al-Dujail or Helebce, put you in it and let it rip.

Of course, none of you would ever survive with honor. Your complete lack of moral courage, your cowardice, in other words, would only allow you to survive one way, by turning jash, because stip away all your "superior" Westernism, all your phony pacifism and humanitarianism, all your hypocritical liberalism, all of your patronizing "concern," and all you really are, in your essence, is nothing more than a filthy jash.

If I believed in some sort of collective karma, I would look at the numbers of those slaughtered by the Saddam regime and count them in the hundreds of thousands, even as the rest of the world watched silently, knew exactly what was happening and did nothing. Then I would think to myself that the rest of the world has a very long way to go yet, until they repay those hundreds of thousands that they permitted to be slaughtered.

But I don't believe in karma. I don't believe in the moral balance of the world as being maintained by some moral force outside of ourselves. Justice and restitution can only come by our taking it into our own hands, to make it happen.

As I wait in that chasm that lies between the abstraction of justice and its fulfillment, I will hope that somehow, somewhere, some day, the "Kellys" of this world meet their own Bully of Baghdad.


Litmus said...

You will probably enjoy this Eric Alterman account then:

"When I asked Wolfowitz who he read outside of official channels that he found particularly profitable, he reeled off the names of a bunch of Iraqi blogs. I asked him if he read Juan Cole. He made a munched up face like his sushi had gone bad. He said that yes, he had read him, but did not do so much, because of all the—I forget his exact words, but I’m thinking “awful crap” –through which he had to slog in order to get the information that Cole presented. I said I thought it would be useful since even if one disagrees, Cole certainly knows what he’s talking about, and his view is closer to the rest of the world’s than are those published in the MSM. He made another bad sushi face."

Mizgîn said...

Sorry for the late reply, Litmus. I have been busy and forgot about your comment. I guess the thing that really bothers me is that people who make comments like the one I commented on seem to have no idea that there are other people in the world and why should those people be subject to the kinds of things that Saddam did? They ignore what happened to the people under Saddam. Sure, when they are questioned on this they shed their crocodile tears because, after all, it's politically incorrect to be "insensitive." I have never heard any of them come up with a viable alternative to either sanctions or war.

If these people hate Kurds, fine, come out and say it, but don't cover up the hate in a burqa of self-righteousness and fake morality just to push your own political agenda.

I think Wolfowitz is into the "good" Kurd/"bad" Kurd thing, which is also extremely problematic for me.

The MSM . . . well, it has to be read carefully, with a critical eye, like everything else.